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Boston Dynamics sells Spot, its robot dog

Boston Dynamics has decided, after years of development, presentations, videos and various studies, to launch the well-known spot, the company’s most famous robot dog, which can climb stairs and cross rough terrain with unprecedented ease.

The first robot dog, contrary to what has been proposed in recent decades in science fiction, will not be useful to stay close to people, perhaps the loneliest or the elderly, to keep them company by the fireplace, but it will be more of a means of transport or exploration. useful in various working or industrial environments.

Equipped with flexible limbs that are precisely matched to those of dogs and legs and allow the transport of useful loads that no current drone (except military) can withstand (about 14 kg), Spot features a maximum speed of 1.6 m/s and an autonomy of one and a half hours. The battery is interchangeable (and by purchasing two can be doubled autonomy).

It is also equipped with a series of sensors and cameras that allow it to avoid obstacles with a panoramic view, which is indispensable on an industrial or working site. It is waterproof (IP54) and can operate from -20° to 45° Celsius.

The robot is inherently remote-controlled and can be particularly useful on construction sites, in the extraction of oil or natural gas (for remote testing of damage or loss) and in the field of public safety (for example for testing explosives). a sector in which, among other things, several advanced robots are already active).

The price? There is no mention on the presentation page of the official Boston Dynamics website (see link below).


Background info and sources:

https://www.bostondynamics.com/spot

Image source:

https://www.extremetech.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/boston-dynamics-spot.jpg

Janice Walker

Janice Walker is a biologist (having graduated from Prescott College in 2013) and an experienced writer. She currently works as a pharmacist, contributing research and content to ScienceOfChange.org during her nights and weekends. During her time at Prescott College she was an active contributor to her student journal and hopes to grow ScienceOfChange.org up as a well established, popular science blog.
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